Posts Tagged ‘templates’

Book Review: Joomla 1.5 Template Design

Packt Publishing recently sent me a review copy of Joomla 1.5 Template Design by Tessa Blakeley Silver. Since I read most of it away from my computer, I wasn’t able to work through the examples. While I can’t speak to how well the code examples matched the actual process of building the template, I did enjoy reading the book. Coming in at 259 pages before the index, this book has enough content to cover everything you need to know while not wearing out its welcome.

The strongest part shines in Chapter 2, where Tessa introduces her “Rapid Design Comping” technique. This markup-centric approach helps you get your typography and HTML right first, then goes back and creates accompanying graphics. By getting your basic HTML and CSS out of the way up front, you don’t run into issues where you’ve designed a layout in PhotoShop that doesn’t translate to the web. Her coverage of this method is easily worth the price of the whole book.

Another plus is that Tessa incorporates HTML and CSS validation as a part of your template design workflow. Although having valid markup does not guarantee that your design will display properly in all browsers, it does help you avoid many such inconsistencies from the outset. She also covers common browser hacks (mostly to accommodate Internet Explorer 6) and how to use them as sparingly as possible. Finally, she also dives into avoiding quirks mode rendering and how to handle inconsistent renderings of the box model.

Coverage of Joomla-specific code and techniques is extensive, including custom module chrome and template parameters. She includes a complete reference for all <jdoc:include /> tags, as well as CSS selectors output by the Joomla core. Joomla template-specific PHP is also explained, but without going too deep into code that might confuse people without a programming background.

Despite a strong foundation in the fundamentals of Joomla templating and HTML/CSS, the book does have faults. There are some places where Tessa states something pensively (for instance, date formatting in XML manifests on page 138) which makes you wonder whether or not she’s confident about what she’s describing. Conversely, her description of the Model-View-Controller design pattern is very confidently stated, but slightly inaccurate. Fortunately, she describes the relevant details of View overrides correctly. That said, a more consistent voice would make the book easier to read.

Less forgivable is the introduction of the jQuery JavaScript library in Chapter 8. While she does a good job of showing jQuery’s power and simplicity, not once does she mention that Joomla already includes MooTools. Worse, readers are not alerted to the fact that jQuery will clash with MooTools if you don’t add the proper workarounds. While I love jQuery as much as Tessa does (and perhaps more), I was quite shocked by the omission. It’s quite possible that Tessa hasn’t run into this conflict, but it does happen frequently.

Despite a few missteps, this book is a solid introduction to the ins and outs of building a template in Joomla. All of the standard syntax is covered, along with a practical overview of how to structure your HTML and CSS for optimal browser compatibility. Advanced topics are also tackled head on, making this book the most complete reference for building Joomla templates that I know of. If you need to build a template or are curious about the process, this book should definitely be on your shelf.

You can read a sample of the book from Packt’s website [PDF], or purchase the book there as well.

New Lynda.com Joomla! videos

Last Friday, Lynda.com released another volume of Joomla! videos created by Jen Kramer McKibben. Now, in addition to watching videos about all of the major content management systems, you can also learn how to create Joomla! templates and CSS with Jen. Head on over to Lynda.com now and preview some of the free videos.